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Hail damage of roof is quite common than what most people think. Taking some proactive steps will help protect your roof against damage and will help you save considerable amount on your roof repair, if you own a home. You will not only ensure that your roof lasts longer but also have less roof repair expenses as well, if you take definitive steps to lessen the effects of the frozen balls on your roof. Investing in hail resistive roofing materials would be advisable and prevent hail damage of roof.

hail damage to roof

Hail storms in the recent times have produced baseball sized hail and this will help you judge the seriousness of the matter. Roofs of residential properties in major cities as well as the suburbs have been extensively damaged due to this. You can very well imagine the degree of damage that the hail of this size can cause to your roof. Hail damage of roof would be more if it is made of asphalt shingles.

roof hail damage

Hail Damaged Roof - Professional Tips That Will Save You Time And Money

Being professional roofing contractors we know all too well the damage hailstorms can do. Hailstorms produce balls of ice ranging in size from a few centimeters up to nearly 6" in diameter. A 6" piece of hail is pretty rare, and would certainly do major damage to your home, but even the more common, smaller hail frequently does enough damage to roofs and siding to require major repair work. Hail damage is not always easy to detect, especially if you have a two or three story home and cannot easily access your roof. Hail damage can leave your home exposed to potential water damage as well as limiting the lifespan of your roof. Because of this you should identify and deal with damage as soon as you can. If you wait too long you may also be denied by your insurance company when you finally get around to filing a claim for the repairs. Have there recently been any hail storms in your area? Do you suspect your home may have been damaged? The following steps will help you determine if there was any damage and outline the steps to getting it repaired. Step One: Check around the exterior of your home for visible damage. Look for things like freshly damaged paint or dents in the siding. If you are able to safely access your roof, look for missing shingles or shingles with blisters or dents. Also, check for dings and dents in your gutters and downspouts. Step Two: Check inside your home for visible damage. New water stains on your ceiling or running down your walls is a problem that needs to be immediately addressed! If you don't fix a roof leak in a timely fashion you could end up having to completely replace your roof, in addition to major repairs do to water leaking into your home. Step Three: Contact your insurance agent right away and make sure they are aware of the damage. They will probably have one of their adjusters out to evaluate your home and prepare a cost estimate for the repairs. Step Four: Contact your own local roofing contractor for an independent evaluation. Even if you trust your insurance agent and their adjuster, you should always get a second opinion from a roofing contractor you trust. Because they don't work for the insurance company they should be less biased in their assessment. Usually the roofing contractor you contact will be willing to communicate with the insurance company if there are any discrepancies in the two evaluations. Step Five: Get everything in writing. The roofing contractor you decide to hire should provide you with a contract detailing the work to be done and what it will cost. You insurance company should also provide you with paperwork about the details of your claim. Cover yourself by getting as much as you need to feel comfortable in writing. roof restoration

Does Your Roof Have Hail Damage? Here's How to Tell

There have been many homes damaged by the recent hail storms. From Georgia to California the insurance companies have been overwhelmed with the amount of claims. The insurance companies have been requesting that homeowners evaluate their property for hail damage. If you suspect that your home may have damage, there are a few key inspections that may confirm your suspicions. The size of the hail will have an impact on the amount of damage you may find to your home. The air conditioning unit is the easiest place to locate damage. The metal coils will have dents that are circular in appearance. It may appear that the unit was struck by hundreds of golf balls. Locate the downspouts that extend down from your gutter system. There may be large amounts of ceramic granules in the drain that have washed off of your roof system. If you find more than a handful of granules, then the integrity of your roof system has been compromised. Be sure to keep the granules in a zip lock bag to show the insurance adjuster when he or she arrives to inspect your home. All homes usually have screens on their windows. The screens are considered an excellent source for locating hail damage. There will be dents in the screens and a torn place or two may be present as well. The larger the hail the bigger the dents will be on the screen mesh. The metal frame that holds the screen in place is likely to have dings and dents visible. Your patio or lawn furniture is a great place to locate hail damage. Most patio or lawn furniture is made from soft metals. These soft metals will show dings and dents if it was stuck by hail stones. The material for your umbrella or the seats may have damaged material with holes present. Your grill will have dents or splatter marks from the impact of hail stones if it was out in the open. The best place to locate the most damage is on your roof system. This can be extremely dangerous so I must advise against scaling a ladder unless you are experienced. The shingles will have divots that are clear to see. It will appear that someone has been teeing off golf balls on your roof. The roof tiles will have round circles present where the granules have been disrupted from the hail. Also, there will be more damage noted on the north elevation due to the Jet Stream. Be sure to check the soft metals on the roof structure for dents or dings.